Commentary, NC Budget and Tax Center, The State of Working North Carolina

Voters agree: Don’t call it a (Carolina) Comeback

We’ve been hearing a lot about a Carolina Comeback for the last few years, but it turns out that most of us haven’t been feeling it. A recent WRAL News poll finds that only a quarter of North Carolina voters think our state’s economy is stronger than it was four years ago. Additionally, “more than two-thirds of voters said their own economic well-being is either the same or worse than it was four years ago.”

Unfortunately, this isn’t a huge surprise. As the latest State of Working North Carolina report shows, bad policy choices have made overall economic growth, jobs, and changing industry opportunities fall far short of what we all need to thrive. This report, Don’t Call it a Comeback, explains the data that back up how North Carolina voters feel about their economic opportunities.

Hopefully lawmakers will take these poll results as a sign: they need to start prioritizing policy decisions that will create an economy that works for all.

Click here for the WRAL News poll.
Click here to see the NC Justice Center’s latest report, Don’t Call it a Comeback.

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