NC Budget and Tax Center

Labor Day fact: SNAP helps 1 in 9 NC workers put food on the table

For many working North Carolinians, their wages alone are not enough to make ends meet. The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as food stamps) is a critical tool many working families rely on in order to put food on the table. According to new analysis from the Center on Budget and Policy Priority, SNAP helps 1 in 9 workers in North Carolina and 495,900 people in working households. SNAP and similar programs are becoming increasingly important as our state economy continues to loose middle-wage jobs. Between 2007 and 2016, North Carolina saw a loss of nearly 81,000 middle-wage occupations and an increase of over 90,000 low-paying jobs.

SNAP helps many workers who earn low wages, who have unpredictable schedules and paychecks, and who are in between jobs.

The report finds that:

  • Many workers and their families participate in SNAP while they are working or are looking for work. SNAP’s program and benefit structure supports work. While many participants work while participating in SNAP, many also apply for benefits to support them while they are between jobs.  Thus, many workers participate in SNAP for part of the year and stop participating when they are earning more.  Three-quarters of the working poor who were eligible for SNAP at some time during the year were eligible for only part of the year, an Agriculture Department study found.
  • Millions of Americans work in jobs with low pay. For example, a recent analysis found that up to 30 percent of Americans work in jobs with pay that would barely lift a family above the poverty line, even if they were working full-time, year-round.
  • Occupations that pay low wages are numerous and many are growing. Six of the 20 largest occupations in the country which together employed about 1 in 8 American workers, had median wages close to or below the poverty threshold for a family of three in 2016:  retail salespersons, cashiers, food preparation and serving workers, waiters and waitresses, stock clerks, and personal care aides). And eight of the ten jobs that are expected to add the most new jobs over the next decade have median wages below the national median, and many much lower.

To learn more about how SNAP supports workers, read the full report here.

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