Commentary

Don’t miss this Thursday’s Crucial Conversation luncheon on Hurricane Matthew

NC Policy Watch presents a special Crucial Conversation luncheon:

Hurricane Matthew one year later: What happened, what hasn’t and how can we do better in the future?

Click here to register

On October 8, 2016, Hurricane Matthew made landfall on North Carolina. The resulting flooding impacted 50 counties in the eastern part of the state, damaging more than 800,000 homes and over 300,000 businesses, while displacing 3,744 residents, and causing closures in 34 school systems. In all, the storm caused $2.8 billion in damages and another $2 billion in lost economic activity.

A year later, the recovery has been, at best, uneven. The Trump administration has provided only a tiny fragment of the federal funding that state leaders requested and, while the state has managed to appropriate meaningful amounts of relief dollars, the unmet need remains huge and important questions persist about what it will take to build a truly equitable and resilient eastern North Carolina. These include:

  • What has been the real world impact of the storm and the inadequate public response on eastern North Carolina?
  • Where are the greatest needs?
  • How can we better manage recovery and prepare for inevitable future natural disasters?

Join us as we discuss these and other important questions with a national expert on disaster recovery and a trio knowledgeable North Carolinians working for progressive change:

Allison Plyler is the Chief Demographer for The Data Center, a New Orleans–based nonprofit research organization with expertise in disaster recovery, regional economic analysis, workforce development, racial disparity indicators, blight reduction, affordable housing, and coastal population movements. Allison is recognized as an international expert in post–Katrina demographics and disaster recovery trends.

Adrienne Kennedy is Vice Chair of the Robeson County Disaster Recovery Committee. She was directly affected by the devastation to her community and has been a key organizer of local responses and services.

Mac Legerton is co-founder and executive director of the Center for Community Action – a nonprofit working for sustainability, poverty reduction, and social justice in southeastern North Carolina.

Brian Kennedy II is a policy fellow at the N.C. Budget and Tax Center who has been tracking Hurricane Matthew needs and public investments.

Click here to register

When: Thursday October 19, at noon — Box lunches will be available at 11:45 a.m.

Where: Center for Community Leadership Training Room at the Junior League of Raleigh Building, 711 Hillsborough St. (at the corner of Hillsborough and St. Mary’s streets)

Click here for parking info.

Space is limited – pre-registration required.

Cost: $15, admission includes a box lunch. Scholarships available.

Click here to register

Questions?? Contact Rob Schofield at 919-861-2065 or rob@ncpolicywatch.com

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