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Interested in running for judicial office in 2018? Here’s a helpful guide

There have been a number of changes to the judicial elections process over the past year, and NC Policy Watch has received a number of questions about the new requirements to run for office.

Changes next year will include adding partisan labels to the ballot and the elimination of judicial primaries. Thankfully, the State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement has prepared a helpful guide for candidates for judicial office in 2018.

Individuals interested in running for a judicial seat must be at least 21 years of age, licensed to practice law in North Carolina, a registered voter in North Carolina and, for district and superior court judges, a registered voter in the district they plan to run in.

Since all judicial contests in the state are now partisan, the candidate shall indicate on their election form either an unaffiliated status or the political party with which they are affiliated. The verified party designation or unaffiliated status shall be included on the ballot, according to the guide.

“During 2018, there will be no primary for judicial office; therefore, the requirement to petition to file as unaffiliated is not in effect for 2018,” the document states.

There could be more changes to come but for now, you can read the full guide below.

Guide_Candidates for Judicial Office 2018 by NC Policy Watch on Scribd

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