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Winning and losing: a tale of two campaign finance reports

Wayne Sasser

Rep. Justin Burr (R-Stanly, Montgomery) may have had more money on hand during the first financial quarter this year, but his primary election challenger, Wayne Sasser, spent more and received more from individuals in his winning campaign for a legislative seat.

Campaign finance reports for the first quarter of this year were released earlier this month by the State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement. Burr started with $22,591.88 and Sasser with $6,909.70, according to each of their finance filings.

The losing incumbent received $49,462.18 in contributions; $23,750 came from political committees, $25,192.18 came from individuals and $520 was reported as aggregated contributions from individuals.

Justin Burr

His biggest individual donor was an optometrist named Stephen Bolick from Raleigh, who made an in-kind donation of $1,647.18 for the cost of a fundraiser dinner. North Carolina Health Care Facilities Association PAC was Burr’s biggest political donation at $5,000.

Sasser received $75,137.91 in contributions, although $20,000 was recorded as a loan from himself. Individuals donated $46,267.81 to his campaign and aggregated individual contributions were $1,960.40. He did not receive any donations from political committees.

His biggest contributions were from Evon Jordan and Jerry Jordan, both from Oakboro, of Jordan Trucking, according to the financial paperwork.

Sasser spent $54,171.40 compared to Burr’s $35,077.19 during the first quarter, according to their filings. Both of their biggest expenditures were mailers — Sasser spent just over $37,000 and Burr spent just over $27,600.

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