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Next stop for voter ID: the Governor’s office

A voter ID bill is on its way to Gov. Roy Cooper’s office after the Senate voted today to pass an updated House version.

Senate Democrats urged lawmakers ahead of the concurrence vote to pause voter ID efforts until after the State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement’s investigation into midterm absentee ballot harvesting and destruction in the 9th congressional district.

Sen. Terry Van Duyn (D-Buncombe) also made a motion on the floor to table the vote on Senate Bill 824, the voter ID measure, until after the investigation.

“You promised the people of North Carolina that if they voted for voter ID that you would secure our elections,” she said, adding that a potential special election in the 9th congressional district still looms. “We simply cannot claim that we are addressing the real issue here.”

Republican Senators voted down her motion to table the vote. The overall bill passed 25-7 in a concurrence vote. It’s not yet known if Cooper will veto the bill.

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