fbpx

Annual report shows decrease in reportable crimes, slight increase in short-term suspensions

Crimes reported by North Carolina high schools dropped by 87 last school year — a 1.6 percent decrease, according to a new state report.

The State Board of Education will discuss the Consolidated Data Report, 2017-18 during its March 6 business meeting.

The report shows that reported acts of school crime and violence dropped to 9,747 from 9,834, while the number of criminal acts per 100 students fell from 6.48 to 6.41.

The 16 criminal acts North Carolina’s school districts are required to report included, homicide, assault resulting in serious bodily injury, assault involving the use of a weapon, rape, sexual offense, sexual assault, kidnapping, robbery with a dangerous weapon, taking indecent liberties with a minor, assault on school personnel, bomb threat, burning of a school building, possession of alcoholic beverage, possession of controlled substance in violation of law, possession of a firearm or powerful explosive, possession of a weapon.

The most reported crimes committed by high schools were possession of a controlled substance in violation of the law, possession of a weapon excluding firearms and powerful explosives and possession of an alcoholic beverage.

While reported crimes overall decreased, there was an uptick in the number of firearms found on school campuses. The number grew by 23, from 105 to 128. That’s a 21 percent increase.

The Consolidated Data Report also includes the state’s annual report on school suspensions.

Short-term suspensions lasting 10 days or less increased 1.3 percent, from 208,539 during the 2016-17 school year to 211,228 last year.

Meanwhile, long-term suspensions of 11 days or more decreased from 3.2 percent, from 695 to 673.

Load More Related Articles
Load More By Greg Childress
Load More In Education

Top Stories from NCPW

  • News
  • Commentary

With the monkeypox outbreak spreading across the country, North Carolina has reported more than 70 cases… [...]

Proposal seeks to prevent repeat of confusion from January 2021 surrounding Vice President's role and duties… [...]

On Tuesday morning, Wake County held its first community meeting on how it will spend its… [...]

Superintendent Catherine Truitt denies plan would introduce "merit pay," but critics strongly disagree With just a… [...]

“We don’t have any teacher applicants for our vacancies,” said two superintendents from rural North Carolina… [...]

As you’ve no doubt noticed, our state, nation and planet are experiencing yet another summer of… [...]

The post The Countdown: Moore v. Harper appeared first on NC Policy Watch. [...]

What a lot of complaining I hear about gas prices. I’ve done some myself. I also… [...]

REPUBLISHING TERMS

You may republish this article online or in print under our Creative Commons license. You may not edit or shorten the text, you must attribute the article to The Pulse and you must include the author’s name in your republication.

If you have any questions, please email [email protected]

License

Creative Commons License AttributionCreative Commons Attribution
Annual report shows decrease in reportable crimes, slight increase in short-term suspensions