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Uh oh, the sausage biscuits didn’t work. Our budget is still a mess.

Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger

To hear North Carolina’s legislative leaders put it Tuesday, Gov. Roy Cooper is nowhere to be found.

While these earnest lawmakers toiled on their $24 billion budget compromise in recent days, Cooper was in New York, they complained, as if we could presume that the Democrat couldn’t be pulled from his junket, sunbathing atop the Chrysler Building, pillowed by a pile of “big city liberal” cash.

As if Cooper and company have not been engaged with legislative leaders for days, weeks and months before Cooper’s New York soiree, a political story with all the depth of a Tweet and the nutritional content of a Twinkie.

“We held this off as long as we could, hoping we could get some input from the governor, but here we are today,” groaned Sen. Harry Brown, the Jacksonville Republican who chairs the Senate’s budget panel.

The putrescent hog farms of Duplin County smell better than this.

Whatever you may think of Cooper, it’s a safe assumption that North Carolina’s journalists, and its people, have a memory surpassing that of a fruit fly.

They may recall legislative leaders’ incessant “bad faith” negotiations, the humiliation of HB2, last year’s unprecedented backdoor budgeting in a conference report, the openly gerrymandered maps, the allegations that they deceived a federal court, cuts crafted in the early morning hours to eviscerate political rivals, and the summoning of legislators following a hurricane to revoke powers from the newly-elected Cooper in December 2016.

The Hamburglar has more credibility than these folks.

Even last week’s sausage biscuit bargaining at the Capitol yielded nothing, while staffers for Cooper and legislative Republicans fired potshots on Twitter.

Democrats said Republicans weren’t willing to come to the table; Republicans countered that the governor had made Medicaid expansion — a cacophony in the far-right Republican caucus and nowhere else on this tortured Earth — a central point of negotiations.

“I’d rather have a budget that reflects a portion of our priorities than no budget at all,” Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger told reporters Tuesday.

Education funding was the greatest amount ever spent in North Carolina history,  Speaker Tim Moore boasted. Good, now we’ll have to see if that raw number means a blessed thing when adjusted for inflation, per-pupil spending, and the needs of a school system that’s been underfunded for the lion’s share of Republican reign.

The knowledge that Moore and House lawmakers cracked on school infrastructure makes for a bad start. At least Moore and company were willing to consider a bond referendum for the state’s $8 billion-plus in school infrastructure needs, but the compromise budget’s “pay-as-you-go” Senate spending plan reeks.

We spoke about “bad faith” earlier, and those who can recall the high-stakes, brouhaha over class-size funding in recent years can appreciate why K-12 advocates are not likely to trust that lawmakers will deliver on school construction needs over the next decade without a bond.

The minority party, which has the votes to sustain a veto, was not impressed.

“Democrats have been clear about our budget priorities: Medicaid expansion, a statewide school construction bond, and no more corporate tax cuts,” Senate Democratic Leader Dan Blue said Tuesday. “The conference report fails to acknowledge any of these; and it makes clear that Republicans don’t understand the value of finding common ground.”

As of this writing, Cooper had no official statement, but his spokespeople didn’t hold back.


The veto seems a foregone conclusion. But compromise, and a fair one that recognizes the priorities of both parties, is not.

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Uh oh, the sausage biscuits didn’t work. Our budget is still a mess.