Education

Retired teachers can return to work in ‘high-needs’ schools without financial penalty

Gov. Roy Cooper signed into law this week Senate Bill 399, which allows retired teachers to return to work in “high needs” schools without financial penalty.

Educators can now earn $35,000 to $41,000 a year and continue to collect state pensions if reemployed to teach at a Title I school or one that has received a school performance grade of “D” or “F.”

The salaries will likely increase after Cooper and GOP lawmakers reach agreement on a state budget that includes pay raises for teachers.

Teachers who return to the classroom will be paid on the first step of the teacher salary scheduled.

If they teach Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (S.T.E.M.) and special education courses, they would be paid on the sixth step of the salary schedule.

The bill had bipartisan support. Its primary sponsors included Sen. Rick Horner, (R-Nash), Sen. Jay Chaudhuri, (D-Wake County) and Senate leader Phil Berger, (R-Rockingham County).

 

 

2 Comments


  1. Ann

    July 15, 2019 at 10:00 am

    Maybe if they paid veteran teachers who haven’t had a raise IN YEARS, they would not be retiring! If the state can afford this, they can afford to give teachers 25 years and up at least a 10% raise!

  2. John

    July 17, 2019 at 4:55 am

    This is a good thing but if teachers are allowed to double dip then other state employees’ should as well. Teachers are not the only class that is in great need of workers just the most PC and vocal.

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