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With plans to build a controversial asphalt plant, Radford Quarries files for bankruptcy, equipment is seized

Update: In response to a reader comment, we have posted within the story the email describing the gun incident.

Radford Quarries, a stone mining company with plans to build an asphalt plant near a camp for seriously ill children, has filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy.

According to the filings, the company has no more than $50,000 in assets while owing between $1 million and $10 million.

Ashe County Line first reported the news of the company’s bankruptcy filing.

Chapter 11 allows the company to continue while reorganizing its finances. However, Radford does operate, it might have to do so without some key equipment. Earlier this week, Caterpillar seized a front loader and a truck. Radford Quarries has filed a motion in court to get them back.

A partial list of creditors includes law firm Poyner Spruill, which successfully defended a related company Appalachian Materials in a legal battle over local permitting of an asphalt plant. If built, the plant would open within a quarter mile of Camp New Hope, which serves children with serious or terminal illnesses.

Radford Quarries owes the law firm more than $243,000.

DJ Cecile Jr. is vice president of Radford Quarries, which has been in business since 1992. Headquartered in Boone, the company mines and sells stone in Ashe, Avery, Watauga and Wilkes Counties.

It also operates a quarry in Johnson County, Tenn.

The company owes several other law firms, machinery companies and the Wilkes County tax collector. However, the creditor list is incomplete; the court filed a notice of deficiency to Radford Quarries yesterday because many documents are missing from the initial bankruptcy filing.

North Carolina is not on the initial list of largest creditors.

Radford Quarries also owes the US Mine Safety and Health Administration $52,000. It’s unclear the source of that debt. The MSHA cited Radford Quarries for four violations in 2017, according to agency records, but they were not considered “serious or substantial.”


State environmental regulators have also repeatedly cited the company for violations. In one instance, after inspectors arrived, Danny Cecile, father of DJ Cecile, “produced a pistol from his pocket,” according to state records, and stated “that the pistol was in case any of the inspectors got ‘out of line.'”

 


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With plans to build a controversial asphalt plant, Radford Quarries files for bankruptcy, equipment is seized