agriculture, Environment

Dead hogs being fished from swamps, workers rescued by kayak: We knew how many farms had flooded. Now we know where they are.

This map shows every Hurricane Florence-related incident — waste lagoons, wastewater treatment plant overflows, coal ash spills, petroleum leaks — that was reported or investigated by state environmental officials. (Map: DEQ)

 

Note: After this story was published, the NC Department of Environmental Quality removed the public database from the agency’s website “for maintenance,” such as correcting a few longitude and latitude figures. However, the database did contain phone numbers for some of the affected swine farms. A DEQ spokeswoman said the database would be reinstated soon, possibly by the end of the week.

Update: As of Thursday, Sept. 27, the database has been reposted online. 

Days after Hurricane Florence devastated eastern North Carolina, fourth-generation hog farmer Brandon Howard had to figure out how to remove “large numbers” of dead pigs from a nearby swamp.

Two of the hog houses at Howard’s 3,200-head farm in Onslow County had been engulfed by floodwaters; two others were half full. Howard “was working with the [Department of Agriculture] to get the hogs out of the swamp by air,” read notes from the state Department of Environmental Quality. “He has folks out trying to capture hogs that are roaming.”

At least 5,500 hogs died during Hurricane Florence. More than 100 swine waste lagoons have sustained damage, flooded, breached or nearly breached since the historic storm hit on Sept. 14, and now it’s known where some of them are.

A public but little-known DEQ map  and database lists every hurricane-related incident –wastewater treatment overflows, coal ash spills, petroleum and other hazardous material releases reported and/or investigated by the agency and its regional offices. (Policy Watch found the information via mappingsupport.com,which provides a full list of available state environmental databases.)

Although most of the hog farm incidents are simple entries, a few contain  anecdotes that can only hint at the anguish and panic of losing lives and property.

As the lagoon began to fill at Ronnie Jarman’s farm, the power went out. He had no more room in his dead box for drowned hogs. And while he has a refrigerated box, it couldn’t function without electricity. 

The hog houses at the Scott Farm, also in Onslow, lost their roofs, the notes read, “and it’s still raining. He needs help with fixing the roof so it will stop putting more water into the lagoons” — which flows from the houses that normally hold up to 3,800 pigs. “He’s unable to find somewhere to get a tarp.”

Farm workers were also in peril. At A&P South Farms, both lagoons overtopped. Employees had to be rescued by kayak.

Here is a partial list of lagoon breaches, discharges and flooding that were listed in the database, plus their counties. In the original table, Policy Watch incorrectly listed the wrong Strickland Farm in Wayne County. The table has been changed to reflect the correct Strickland Farm in Sampson County.

 

Permit NumberFacility NameCombined OwnerAllowable CountNumber Of LagoonsIncidentCounty NameLocation Lat NumLocation Long NumAddress 1City 
AWS670003Brandon Howard Farm #2Brandon Howard32711Lagoon Inundation Onslow34.8389-77.4967437 Rhodestown RdJacksonville
AWS670010Scott FarmGeorge Scott38401Damage to hog barn roofsOnslow34.8167-77.3856Jim Parker RdJacksonville
AWS520016White Oak River Farms (Forrest Nursery)White Oak River Farms LLC32001Lagoon overtopping/dischargeJones34.9181-77.3708203 Neuhoff LnMaysville
AWS520078Robert Cox Green FarmRobert Cox6001Lagoon overtopping/dischargeJones35.0686-77.445621 Stroud RdTrenton
AWS520036Clayhill Farms, Inc.Elijah Morton20001Lagoon inundation from creekJones34.9917-77.29171087 Davis Field RdPollocksville
AWS310318R & K Jarman Farms 4-7Ronnie Jarman24801Lagoon inundation/dischargeDuplin34.8972-77.8133305 Brown Rd NBeaulaville
AWS510020Sammy Britt Farm houses 1-6Sammy Britt37201Water from hog barn reached surface watersJohnston35.2878-78.32900 Langston RdNewton Grove
AWS310475Reeda Meadows Farms 1 & 2Rufus Rouse36982Lagoon Inundation and dischargeDuplin34.8531-77.85971672-A Pasture Branch RdBeulaville
AWS540111Morgan Farms, Inc.Michael Morgan9605Lagoon InundationLenoir35.1379-77.6668832519 Mark Smith RdDeep Run
AWS310128Triple D Farm, LLCJamie Dail61202Two lagoons inundated but no animals on farmDuplin34.7556-77.6833428 Bear Pond RdRichlands
AWS310166RL Pickett FarmRichard Pickett36721Lagoon inundationDuplin34.8564-77.86561593 Pasture Branch RdBeulaville
AWS820493A & P SouthA & P Farms LLC10643Lagoon overtoppedSampson34.668088-78.2533365527 Wildcat RdHarrells
AWS820698Allen Cannady Farm #1Robert Cannady52001Lagoon overtoppedSampson34.839658-78.3720162181 Wright Bridge RdClinton
AWS820557Strickland Farms Harold Strickland43502Large lagoon wall failure releasing all waste to streamSampson34.86617735.23-78.1722-78.297888Ozzie RoadClinton
AWS310273NH Herring FarmNicholas Herring26401Lagoon InundationDuplin35.0494-77.9878751 Veaches Mill RdWarsaw
AWS310445Terry Miller Farm sites 1&2Terry Miller32002Lagoon overtoppedDuplin34.875-77.86671816 Pasture Branch RdBeulaville
AWS310548Carl Baker FarmElijah Baker11961Lagoon overtoppedDuplin34.9869-77.80641278 N NC 111Beulaville
AWS310376Duplin 1 & 2Wbw Sow Farms LLC72002Lagoon overtoppedDuplin35.0022-77.85531604 N NC 11 903 HwyKenansville
AWS760003Applefield Farm-Lower & UpperPhilip Faucette124002Lagoon inundationRandolph35.6208-79.61534599 Riverside DrRamseur
AWS310131Hunter FarmsMichael Hunter24481Lagoon inundationDuplin34.8369-77.7056258 Authar Sloan RdChinquapin
AWS310419Henry D. Teachey FarmKenneth Brown18601Dike wall break/lagoon emptiedDuplin34.8619-77.9489421 Stocking Head RdRose Hill
AWS710033Coastal FarmsKenneth Lanier24481Lagoon Inundation and dischargePender34.475-77.8625Rocky Point
AWS520064W&P Farms IncW & P Farms Inc76802Lagoon 2 inundatedJones35.1064-77.41583 Wyse Fork RdTrenton
AWS820545Craig Collins FarmCraig Collins5161Inground lagoon inundated discharged onto fieldsSampson34.66978-78.2938442625 Wilber Pridgen RdHarrells
CATTLE/DAIRY: AWC760031 McCain DairyWilliam Frazier13013Waste flowing from spillway, traveled 100 feet toward woods. Sandbags keeping it from Lake Lucas, Asheboro's water supplyRandolph35.7456-79.86171904 Lake Lucas RdSophia
AWC990012Shady Grove DairyTim Smitherman148033/5 waste ponds are over; facility out of compliance since August rainfallYadkin36.2331-80.52584408 Shady Grove Church RdEast Bend
Duplin 1 and 2 lagoon overtopping
P1,2, 11, 17 previously overtopped AWS 820415, 412, 511 0900089 AWS 820349 previously overtopped 820511
Environment

Duke Energy reporting another coal ash breach at Sutton; shuts down nat gas plant

Flood waters from Sutton Lake are surrounding Duke Energy’s natural gas plant there, forcing the utility to temporarily shut it down. (Photo: Duke Energy)

The Cape Fear River has overtopped a dam at Sutton Lake in Wilmington, sending coal ash into the water body from the 1971 ash basin. The lake provides cooling water for Duke Energy’s Sutton plant.

According to the utility, cenospheres, which are coal combustion byproducts, are moving from that basin into the lake and onto the Cape Fear River. Cenospheres are lightweight hollow beads that can contain not only silica and aluminum, but also arsenic and lead.

The second coal ash basin, built in 1984, is stable and has not been affected, the utility said. The lined ash landfill, which suffered two breaches in its slope last weekend, is not affected by the lake water. The landfill is being repaired.

Meanwhile, lake water has surrounded the natural gas plant at the Sutton site, requiring personnel to shut it down.

Duke Energy had previously shut down both reactors at its Brunswick County nuclear plant, but only one remains offline as of today. The second unit is operating at 69 percent, according to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Environment

Near the Dan River and Belews Lake, the 311 Motor Speedway is in Duke Energy’s inundation zone. Now we know just how bad a flood can be

 

The 311 Speedway in Stokes County lies in a bowl near the Dan River and is in a designation inundation zone for releases upstream from Duke Energy’s Belews Creek Lake. (Photo courtesy: Michael Fulp)

On Saturday night, souped-up muscle cars — 602 Mods, Ucars and crates — were supposed to race 20 laps on the half-mile dirt track the 311 Motor Speedway in Stokes County. Last Tuesday, the track was better suited for racing by boat.

Policy Watch wrote about the 311 Motor Speedway last year in a story about Duke Energy’s inundation zone maps: areas that would be in danger should a coal ash impoundment or landfill breach. No such accident occurred in Stokes County during Hurricane Florence, but Duke Energy did have to release water from its Belews Lake dam to prevent even worse flooding, including in areas downstream. That water flowed into the Dan River, which runs 2 miles before ducking behind a tree line adjacent to the 311 Speedway.

When Michael Fulp went to sleep on Saturday, there was minor flooding at the track, but nothing to be concerned about. When he woke up on Sunday, though, he discovered the infield was under water, as was part of the backstretch straightaway. Water had climbed about halfway up the infield buildings. Fulp said he canceled all of the weekend’s races.

Although in the past the Dan River has broken its banks and flowed onto the speedway property, Fulp said it was not to this extent. Fulp blames the utility for the excessive flooding, and said he’s upset that no one notified him of the planned release. “I found out about it on Facebook,” he said. 

Duke Energy spokeswoman Kim Crawford said the company lowered the lake level by 2 feet on the Friday before the storm hit to accommodate the heavy rain, and then during and after the storm, it conducted a controlled release that contributed just 1 percent to the Dan River’s overall flow.

“This small controlled release is similar to how we normally operate during any heavy rainfall event,” Crawford said. By lowering the lake levels before the storm it, Duke Energy “reduced our water contributions to the Dan River.”

The marker at the top of the frame shows the location of 311 Motor Speedway. It is about 2 miles
to Belews Lake, which empties into the Dan River. This portion of river runs northeast, toward
Virginia, so the speedway is downstream of the lake.

It could cost Fulp upward of $10,000 to repair the speedway, he said. Guardrail, even used, can run more than $100 per foot.

What the flooding did confirm is that the Duke Energy’s inundation maps are correct: 311 Speedway lies in a vulnerable spot downstream — and nowhere you want to be during a disaster, natural or otherwise.

 

 

The 311 Motor Speedway in drier times. Although the track takes on some water in heavy rain, owner Michael Fulp said the flooding from Hurricane Florence was unprecedented. (File photo: Lisa Sorg)

 

agriculture, Environment

From the air, a view of hog farms improperly spraying waste on soaked fields; DEQ can’t access area to inspect

A hog farm in eastern North Carolina spraying waste from a lagoon on Monday, Sept. 17, 2018. This practice violates permit regulations stipulating that waste can’t be applied to fields that are saturated. The sprayer is shown above the upper lagoon; at the top left of the frame, water is standing in the field. (Aerial photos: Lisa Sorg)

The number of hog lagoons at risk was updated from 80 to 110 at 4:16 p.m.

Flood damage from Hurricane Florence is jeopardizing roughly 110 of the state’s 3,300 hog lagoons, but there is another route for waste to leave these farms: runoff from the sprayfields.

Farmers routinely pump waste from the lagoons onto the fields, which they use to grow hay and other crops to feed livestock. But spraying waste on saturated agricultural land violates both EPA regulations and the terms of the state general permits under which North Carolina’s hog farms operate. When waste-laden water runs off these fields, it can contaminate nearby rivers, streams, wetlands or adjacent properties.

During a flyover of eastern North Carolina on Monday, Policy Watch observed at least two farms that were spraying waste from their hog lagoons, ostensibly to keep them from overflowing — an even more severe environmental disaster in its own right. From the air, it was unclear whether the farms were contracted with Smithfield or Prestage Farms. Riverkeepers reported at least a dozen more incidents of spraying, but Policy Watch has not been able to independently verify those accounts.

A Department of Environmental Quality spokeswoman said state inspectors couldn’t yet get to the farms to follow up on their operations. The Fayetteville Regional Office, located downtown near Cross Creek, was evacuated. Regional offices in Washington and Wilmington are not fully functioning because of power outages and flooding.

It is also illegal to spray within 48 hours of the issuance of a hurricane watch or severe thunderstorm warning.

One of the controversies about waste application is whether it is a “nutrient management strategy” — a way to fertilize cropfields — or merely an expedient way to get rid of the waste. The waste can be applied only at “agronomic rates,” which are calculated by crop, soil type and other factors; the amounts are detailed in each farm’s nutrient waste management plan. “Land application is for crops to take up fertilizer,” said Michelle Nowlin, supervising attorney at the Duke University Environmental Law and Policy Clinic. “If the land is saturated, there’s no way the crops can take up the nutrients.”

Hog farms and their lagoons in eastern North Carolina, Sept. 17, 2018. The bottom lagoon appears inundated, but it’s unclear whether a breach has occurred.

After Hurricane Floyd, Nowlin, then an attorney with the Southern Environmental Law Center, successfully sued the state environmental agency over how it allowed farms to spray their waste. As part of a settlement agreement, the state agreed it would prohibit spraying in the aftermath of a storm, Nowlin said. “If the state turns a blind eye, it’s in violation of that agreement,” she added.

The Coastal Plain is less than optimal for industrialized animal operations. Hurricanes and inland flooding imperil the animals themselves, as well as the lagoon-and-sprayfield method of waste management.

“Once again, as if we needed a reminder, the hurricane exposes the insanity of even allowing this type of production and waste disposal in the Coastal Plain,” Nowlin said. “But it’s an opportunity to think about new technologies, mandated in accordance with the state’s authority and what the industry can afford. They [the industry] is putting their costs on society. Can we afford the industry’s imposition of these costs?”


What to do with 5,500 dead hogs and 3.4 million dead chickens

The storm killed 5,500 of the roughly 9.3 million hogs housed in industrialized farms in North Carolina, and that number will likely increase as flood waters recede and reveal the carcasses.

Smithfield tried to stem the number of fatalities by transferring hogs from farms that were flooded in 1999 during Hurricane Floyd to operations outside that vulnerable area. Floyd was a catastrophic turning point for the hog industry; it killed an estimated 30,000 hogs and unleashed a 500-year flood, meaning the chances of such an event occurring in a given year is 1 in 500, or 0.2 percent.

However, Hurricane Florence outdid Floyd, with eastern rivers rising at least 5 feet from record levels. “It was new territory for the industry,” said Kraig Westerbeek, senior director of Smithfield Renewables and Hog Production Division Environmental Affairs.

Prestage Farms couldn’t be reached for comment.

The poultry industry sustained even greater losses: at least 3.4 million birds.

The NC Department of Agriculture has issued protocols for the disposal of animal carcasses, including buffer zones between the composting area and waterways and property lines. In some cases, the bodies can be deposited in landfills.

“One of the disconnects here is dealing with the mortalities,” Nowlin said. The disposal falls under not DEQ but the NC Department of Agriculture’s veterinary division, which focuses on preventing disease. “Where the animals are disposed and how,” is important, Nowlin added. If they are improperly disposed of, the decaying bodies can contaminate groundwater.

It takes about 28 days for a chicken carcass to decompose, and six months or more for larger animals.

This hog waste lagoon appears to have been spared.

 

 

 

 

Environment, public health

At least 1.4 million people in North Carolina experiencing drinking water shortage, uncertainty after hurricane

 

More than 1.4 million people on public and community water systems don’t have reliable drinking water, as of Tuesday afternoon. The problems are plaguing 219 of the state’s 481 permitted systems. Source: Department of Public Safety

Low water pressure, no water, potentially contaminated water: More than 1.4 million people in North Carolina don’t have a reliable source of water from their public systems, according to the NC Department of Public Safety.

This figure doesn’t include people who are on private drinking water wells and whose systems could be polluted or shut off because of flooding. The safety of private wells is under the Department of Health and Human Services.

Forty-six percent of 481 public and community systems — such as those serving mobile home parks — are not fully functioning.

(Scroll to the bottom of the story for a comprehensive list, broken out by reason for the outage, name of the system and number of customers affected.)

Affected cities and towns include Rockingham, Oak Island and Grifton. Morgan Elementary School in Gold Hill, near Salisbury, has no water because the system has failed to operate

Of the affected people on public water, more than 38,000 are customers of public and/or community systems that can’t produce any water and are essentially closed.

Another 270,000 people are experiencing low water pressure; 19,000 are waiting for test results on their water to determine whether it is safe to drink. More than 1 million people are on water systems that are operating off emergency interconnections — borrowing water from other suppliers — are on backup power or are using only stored water. The McCain Correctional Hospital, in Raeford,  is among the systems using an emergency interconnect.

And a half-million people are under boil water orders or advisories, according to environmental officials.

CLOSED: SYSTEM NOT PRODUCING WATER 
NameTotal number of customers
ATLANTIC MHP113
ATLANTIC MHP II106
BIG RIDGE MHP50
BILLY K CAMPGROUND180
BLADEN BLUFFS WATER SYSTEM4589
BOLTON, TOWN OF750
CAMERON BOYS CAMP75
CAMP DON-LEE200
CASTLE CREEK MEMORY CARE86
CIRCLE D MHP91
COVIA CORPORATION43
DOWN EAST MHP107
GOOSE CREEK RESORT1600
GREEN ACRES MHP229
HUNTING ESTATES80
INTERNATIONAL PAPER ADMINISTATIVE SYSTEM30
INTERNATIONAL PAPER COMPANY750
INTERNATIONAL PAPER- NEW BERN MILL375
LAKE ROAD MHP40
LEA`S WATERFRONT MHP99
LIGHTHOUSE WAY MHP & APTS38
MAYSVILLE, TOWN OF1100
MCAS BT11-PINEY ISLAND25
MORGAN ELEMENTARY SCHOOL539
NATIONAL SPINNING COMPANY WHITEVILLE275
NEWPORT RIDGE MHP71
NORRIS MHP91
OCEAN SPRAY MH S/D368
PERDUE FOODS LLC2000
PORT OF MOREHEAD CITY174
PORT OF WILMINGTON280
RIVERSTONE99
SANDERSON FARMS1300
SEA SCAPE60
SMITHFIELD FRESH MEATS CORP - TAR HEEL4589
SURF CITY, TOWN OF5606
THE VILLAGE OF BALD HEAD ISLAND3254
TOPSAIL BEACH, TOWN OF3198
USMC LEJEUNE--ONSLOW BEACH320
WILLOW POINT MOBILE HOME PARK22
WRIGHTSVILLE BEACH WATER SYST5212
Total number of systems 41
Total number of customers 38214
Water pressure problems 
Name of systemNo. of customers
BELVEDERE PLANTATION3195
BRAGG ESTATES WATER SYSTEM363
BROOKWOOD COMM WTR SYSTEM15665
BRUNSWICK COUNTY WATER SYSTEM95739
CHANDA`S RIDGE70
CLARENDON GARDENS S/D276
GRAY`S CREEK MHP212
HARKERS VILLAGE S/D94
JONES COUNTY WATER SYSTEM8999
KINSTON, CITY OF27475
LAURINBURG, CITY OF17242
OAK ISLAND, TOWN OF23635
ROBESON COUNTY WATER SYSTEM64295
SAMPSON CO WTR DIST I-ROSEBORO148
SCOTLAN CO WATER-NORTH2566
SCOTLAND CO WATER-SOUTH3424
SEAGATE IV105
SOUTHPORT CITY OF6447
WRIGHTSBORO S/D100
Total no. of systems19
Total no. of customers
270050
Needs testing to clear advisory 
Name of systemNo. customers
ALBANY ACRES S/D81
ALTICE ESTATES S/D320
BELLA VISTA S/D25
CAMELOT S/D604
CREEKSTONE S/D498
FAIRFIELD HARBOUR4610
HARDSCRABBLE S/D640
HUNTER`S RIDGE S/D92
LEGEND HILLS S/D81
MAXTON, TOWN OF3125
NOTTINGHAM FOREST S/D543
OCEAN ISLE BEACH, TOWN OF7051
OLDE MILLS LAKE S/D96
PACEVILLE S/D58
RED MOUNTAIN S/D173
ROYAL ACRES S/D63
STANLEY STONE ESTATES52
STEPHANIE WOODS S/D245
SWEET BRIAR S/D143
THORNBURG S/D165
TIMBERLINE SHORES210
WEYERHAEUSER-SOUTHERN LUMBER185
Total no. of systems: 22
Total no. of customers: 19060
No Power 
NameNo. of customers
EAGLE`S NEST #124
EAGLE`S NEST #224
HARBOR HOUSE S/D142
JACKSON HEIGHTS MHP200
LEA ACRES WATER CO INC120
MELBILLE HEIGHTS96
MISSION PARK B&L TRAILER COURT65
OAKLEY MHP92
OSPREY COVE 1475
OYSTER POINT S/D99
RHA HOWELL CARE CENTER CLEAR CREEK302
ROBINFIELD ESTATES S/D124
SHADY HAVEN MHP46
SHERWOOD MHP353
SPERANZA`S MHP90
No. of systems affected 15
No. of customers2252
Operating off emergency interconnect 
NameNo. of customers
DOC-MCCAIN HOSPITAL850
DUBLIN, TOWN OF447
EAST ARCADIA, TOWN OF609
GREENFIELD HEIGHTS S/D145
GRIFTON, TOWN OF2800
JASON WATER CORPORATION331
PARKTON, TOWN OF487
RIEGELWOOD SANITARY DISTRICT460
ROCKINGHAM, CITY OF13159
SHINE WATER CORPORATION447
TAR HEEL WATER CORP250
TURKEY, TOWN OF300
Total No. of systems12
Total no. of customers20285
Operating backup power 
NameNo. of customers
ABERDEEN, TOWN OF9935
ATLANTIC BEACH, TOWN OF6380
AURORA WATER SYSTEM502
BALLOU MHP95
BEAUFORT CO SOUTHSIDE9203
BEAUFORT, TOWN OF4539
BEULAVILLE, TOWN OF1326
BISHOPS RIDGE S/D170
BLADEN CO WTR DIST-EAST BLADEN3853
BLADEN CO WTR DIST-WEST BLADEN11844
BOGUE BANKS WATER CORPORATION4995
BRANDYWINE BAY2189
BURGAW, TOWN OF4250
CABARRUS ACRES WATER SYSTEM46
CALYPSO, TOWN OF660
CAMERON, TOWN OF490
CAROLINA BEACH WATER SYSTEM10632
CFPUA/MONTEREY HEIGHTS8202
CFPUA/NHC29052
CFPUA-WILMINGTON137414
CHADWICK MHP90
CHINQUAPIN WATER ASSOCIATION4686
CHOCOWINITY WATER SYSTEM2550
CLARKTON, TOWN OF1500
CLINTON, CITY OF12410
CRAVEN COUNTY WATER SYSTEM32500
DOT-CEDAR ISLAND FERRY TERM200
DUPLIN COUNTY WATER SYSTEM17000
EASTMAN CREEK LANDING S/D335
ELIZABETHTOWN, TOWN OF5212
FIGURE 8 ISLAND999
FREMONT, TOWN OF1463
GLYNNWOOD MHP208
GREENEVERS, TOWN OF1390
GRIMESLAND, TOWN OF610
HARKERS ISLAND SANITARY DIST2358
HARNETT CO DEPT OF PUBLIC UTIL98905
HARRELLS WATER CORP1633
HAVELOCK WATER SYSTEM14246
JACKSONVILLE CITY OF45598
KENANSVILLE, TOWN OF876
KURE BEACH WATER SYSTEM5110
LAURADALE S/D2527
LUMBERTON, CITY OF25590
MANN`S MHP40
MARINE CORPS AIR STATION CHERRY POINT17144
MCAS ATLANTIC FIELD32
MERRIMON WATER SYSTEM71
MINTZ CHRISTIAN ACADEMY150
MOREHEAD CITY, TOWN OF9420
MOUNTAINBROOK S/D152
NEUSE REGIONAL WTR & SWR AUTH93238
NEW BERN, CITY OF30070
NEWPORT WATER SYSTEM4827
NORTH RIVER/MILL CREEK WATER SERVICE DIS2800
NORTHWEST ONSLOW WATER ASSOC1890
ONSLOW WTR AND SEWER AUTHORITY126761
ORIENTAL WATER SYSTEM903
PAMLICO COUNTY WATER15546
PEMBROKE, TOWN OF4111
PENDER COUNTY UTILITIES18000
PIKEVILLE, TOWN OF714
PINE KNOLL SHORES3861
POTTERS HILL WATER ASSOCIATION94
PRUITT HEALTH AT SEA LEVEL102
RED SPRINGS, TOWN OF4493
ROSE HILL, TOWN OF1862
ROWLAND, TOWN OF1341
SALEMBURG, TOWN OF850
SAMPSON CO WTR DIST II8670
SANDERSON`S MHP34
SEAGATE I345
SIDBURY`S MHP101
SNUG HARBOR ON NELSON BAY108
SOUTHERN PINES, TOWN OF17379
STERLINGSHIRE S/D147
THE CAPE MASTER SYSTEM9728
TOPSAIL GREENS S/D549
TOWN OF ATKINSON301
TREASURE COVE S/D760
USMC LEJEUNE-DEVIL DOG-VERONA LOOP800
USMC LEJEUNE--HADNOT POINT37500
USMC LEJEUNE--HOLCOMB BLVD17000
USMC LEJEUNE--NEW RIVER AIR ST11500
USMC LEJEUNE--RIFLE RANGE750
WADE, TOWN OF835
WAGRAM, TOWN OF801
WALLACE, TOWN OF5825
WALNUT CREEK VILLAGE990
WARSAW, TOWN OF3151
WAYNE WATER DISTRICTS32426
WAYNE WATER DISTRICTS PURCHASE16302
WEST CARTERET WATER CORP15311
WHITE LAKE, TOWN OF2500
WHITE STREET INDUSTRIAL PARK800
Total no. systems 95
Total no. customers 1046858
Using stored water only 
NameNo. of customers
BRUNSWICK REGIONAL WATER AND SEWER H2GO25583
CASTLE BAY S/D685
HOLDEN BEACH, TOWN OF6200
SIMMONS HEIGHTS APARTMENTS35