Courts & the Law, News

Does the constitution require lawmakers to provide public notice of special sessions?

From left: Judges Martin McGee, Wayland Sermons Jr. and Todd Pomeroy

What does the constitutional right to instruct mean? Did lawmakers violate it when they called a special session in 2016 with just two hours’ notice?

Those are some of the questions a three-judge panel is considering in the case of Common Cause v. Forest, a lawsuit challenging the constitutionality of the session in which two laws were passed that changed the power structure of state government.

“What the defendants did was undemocratic, unprecedented and unconstitutional,” said Burton Craige, an attorney representing the plaintiffs — Common Cause NC and 10 state residents.

He told the judges that the 2016 fourth extra special session was the only one in 75 years that did not provide advance notice to the public that a special session would be convened and notice of the purpose of the special session.

In addition to the lack of notice, lawmakers passed a number of special rules that Craige said truncated the legislative process and deprived members of the public a meaningful opportunity to participate.

“Even citizens well-versed in the legislative process did not have a practical opportunity to communicate with their legislators,” Craige said.

He pointed to an affidavit submitted by Common Cause NC Executive Director Bob Phillips that said the organization did not have enough time to review bills, offer inside analysis or suggestions to make the legislation better.

Burton Craige

“This was legislation by ambush; this was a premeditated assault on democracy,” Craige said.

His solution is for the court to apply a constitutional test that applies to the circumstances of the case — the legislature should be required to either provide advance notice to the public of a special session and its purpose or provide some justification for its departure from historical precedent.

He accused the defendants, Lieutenant Gov. Dan Forest, House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger, of providing no justification for the 2016 special session.

“There was no reason other than to exclude the public from participating,” Craige said. “We have to look at the circumstances, and here the circumstances we have are zero notice, extraordinarily complex legislation, deliberate secrecy and no explanation for why.”

Matthew Tulchin, of the State Department of Justice, argued that lawmakers did in fact give notice and that Craige was using rhetoric to make a policy argument.

“Underneath it all though, what this is about, is the plaintiffs don’t like the two laws enacted,” he said.

He added that lawmakers have a right to determine what processes and procedures they follow, and that there is no expressed time or notice requirement in the constitution. He also said that the public had 44 hours to review the bills introduced during the 2016 special session.

Matthew Tulchin

“It’s erroneous to say that there wasn’t any notice,” Tulchin said. “Hundreds of people showed up at the General Assembly … and expressed their viewpoints in loud enough terms to disrupt their session.”

The three-judge panel had numerous questions for both Tulchin and Craige, but one they seemed to come back to was what the right to instruct meant in Article 1, Section 12 of the North Carolina Constitution.

The three judges presiding over the case are are Judge Wayland Sermons, a registered Democrat who serves the second judicial district, which includes Beaufort County; Judge Martin McGee, a registered Republican who serves Cabarrus County; and Judge W. Todd Pomeroy, a registered Republican who serves Cleveland and Lincoln counties.

Tulchin compared the right to instruct with dead letter law — a law that is still in effect but cannot be enforced because of a change in circumstances.

“It is a function of the times of when it was enacted,” he said, noting that technology now is a lot different than when the provision was enacted.

He also said the provision was a process of a representative government, which the state has, and voters could exercise their rights at the ballot box.

Craige argued that the provision is meant to give voters a meaningful opportunity to participate in the legislative process.

“Those words have meaning,” he said. “They would eliminate these words from the constitution, pretend they don’t exist, and of course, they can’t do that. This court can’t do that.”

Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

New redistricting lawsuit filed over four Wake County legislative districts

A new redistricting lawsuit has been filed in state court, this time challenging the constitutionality of four state House districts in Wake County.

The same districts were challenged in the racial gerrymandering case, North Carolina v. Covington, based on a state constitution prohibition on mid-decade redistricting — lawmakers were accused of redrawing districts they didn’t have to during a court-ordered remedial map-making process.

A special master redrew those districts and the U.S. District Court ordered they be used in this year’s elections, but the U.S. Supreme Court stayed the districts, likely because they involved issues of state law, not federal law.

GOP lawmakers at the time argued that if the plaintiffs wanted to litigate issues of state law, they should file a lawsuit in state court. Plaintiffs in a similar racial gerrymandering case pending at the state level then tried to resolve the issue, but a three-judge panel agreed a week ago that a new lawsuit was necessary.

The new lawsuit was filed on behalf of North Carolina NAACP, the League of Women Voters of North Carolina, Democracy North Carolina, North Carolina A. Philip Randolph Institute and four individual plaintiff-voters from Wake County.

“Voters in North Carolina have a state constitutional right to have their legislative districts changed only once a decade,” said Allison Riggs, senior voting rights attorney at SCSJ and lead attorney in the case. “This is an important protection in state law — one that many states don’t have — and its clear purpose is to prevent the ills of gerrymandering and political gamesmanship present here.”

The lawsuit asks that the four state House Districts in Wake County be returned to their 2011 boundaries in time for 2018 state legislative elections. The primary election is scheduled for May 8, and legislative candidates have only until the end of the month to file elections paperwork.

“North Carolinians have not been able to vote in constitutional state legislative districts this decade,” said Janet Hoy, co-President of the League of Women Voters of NC. “Lawmakers have dodged their obligations to enact fair districts time and time again. That will not deter us from continuing to push fair districts for voters that comply with the state and federal constitutions.”

There also was a House district in Mecklenburg County challenged on the state constitution violation grounds in the Covington case, but it is not included in this lawsuit.

Courts & the Law, News

3-judge panel will hear arguments over constitutionality of 2016 special session

A three-judge panel will hear arguments tomorrow challenging a surprise special legislative session from 2016 in which lawmakers made changes to existing power structures in the state.

Common Cause North Carolina and 10 state residents filed suit last year against Lieutenant Gov. Dan Forest, House Speaker Tim Moore and Senate President Pro Tem Phil Berger over the constitutionality of the special session, which was called with just two hours notice and no public disclosure on what bills would be considered.

The lawsuit seeks to void two bills that were passed during that special session: Senate Bill 4 — an omnibus measure that changed the structure of state and county boards of elections, created partisan appellate elections and took some appointment power from the governor; and House Bill 17 — a measure transferring power from the State Board of Education to newly elected Republican Department of Public Instruction Superintendent Mark Johnson.

Both of those bills have been challenged separately in unrelated lawsuits.

The three judges assigned to hear the Common Cause v. Forest case are Judge Wayland Sermons, a registered Democrat who serves the second judicial district, which includes Beaufort County; Judge Martin McGee, a registered Republican who serves Cabarrus County; and Judge W. Todd Pomeroy, a registered Republican who serves Cleveland and Lincoln counties.

The hearing will be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday in courtroom 303 at Campbell University School of Law, on Hillsborough Street.

Courts & the Law, News

Judge turned lawmaker Morey proposes gun violence restraining order in NC

Rep. Marcia Morey (D-Durham)

Rep. Marcia Morey (D-Durham) is calling on her colleagues to pass legislation that would remove guns from individuals who are considered a danger to themselves or others.

A Gun Violence Restraining Order (GVRO) is similar to a Domestic Violence Restraining Order in that it would allow a district court judge to order the removal of all firearms from a person who “by clear and convincing evidence has exhibited threatening, erratic or dangerous behavior,” according to a news release from Morey.

It differs from the domestic violence order in that the petitioner would not have to be in an intimate or familial relationship with the person accused of the dangerous behavior.

Morey’s proposal comes days after 19-year-old Nikolas Cruz opened fire with an AR-15 assault-style rifle in a South Florida high school and killed 17 people.

There have since been numerous media reports about Cruz’s telling behavior before the mass shooting.

“This gun restraining order proposal is not a solution to gun violence, but can be a step in the right direction to thwart future tragedies as it provides for people who ‘see something’ have the power not only to ‘say something’ but can ‘do something’ by going to court,” Morey states in her release. “As we now know numerous warnings about Nikolas Cruz were missed in Broward County. The FBI received the exact information that would have allowed a citizen to apply for a GVRO.”

Morey was a judge for 18 years before joining the legislature. She said she has presided over hundreds of defendants in criminal court with charges of murder and gun violence.

“Time and time again, I heard co-workers, neighbors and victims testify, ‘He was a time bomb. I knew this was going to happen,'” she wrote.

Time and time again, I heard co-workers, neighbors and victims testify, 'He was a time bomb. I knew this was going to happen.' Click To Tweet

Her proposal would allow anyone — such as a teacher, co-worker or acquaintance — with first-hand knowledge of another person who is in possession of or has access to a firearm, and is behaving in a threatening manner, to petition a district court judge for a GVRO. If granted, a judge would order law enforcement to immediately (and temporarily) take and secure any and all firearms from that person.

There would then be a hearing scheduled within 10 business days to give all parties an opportunity to testify why or why not the firearms should be taken away. If a judge finds “by clear and convincing evidence” that a gun violence threat exists, that person would be prohibited from possessing a firearm for one year. A violation of the civil restraining order would result in a criminal charge.

“Personally, I want to see federal legislation that would ban all AR-15s, semi-automatic military guns and bumpstocks,” Morey said. “A GVRO is not a panacea for stopping gun violence, but it could be a first step. The time to act with common sense legislation is now.”

There are a handful of states (Connecticut, Indiana, Texas, California, Oregon and Washington) that have some version of a law that allows either law enforcement or individuals with a relationship to a person considered to be dangerous to petition a court to remove their firearms.

A federal GVRO law was proposed by Congress last year and there has been a renewed calling for its passage since the Florida shooting.

There have been four mass shootings since mid-2015 in which federal authorities had a chance to intervene before they occurred — the Charleston church shooting, the Orlando nightclub shooting, the Sutherland Springs church shooting and now the Florida high school shooting.

National Review, a conservative editorial magazine, recently wrote at length about GVRO proposals, noting that advocates “have been mostly clustered on the left, but there is nothing inherently leftist about the concept.”

“After all, the GVRO is consistent with and recognizes both the inherent right of self-defense and the inherent right of due process,” the article states. “It is not collective punishment. It is precisely targeted.”

The National Rifle Association and other groups have opposed such laws as violating gun owners’ due process rights, according to a recent Reuters article.

It’s too early to tell where North Carolina lawmakers will stand on the issue.

Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

Which judges are double-bunked in the new maps? Here’s a list

Lawmakers have said they won’t be back until May to take up judicial redistricting, but dropped two new maps before adjourning a special session this week.

The maps this time were released with incumbency information, but not without errors. NC Policy Watch analyzed the information (again) and found that there are more judges double-bunked in the new proposals (Options B and C) than in the Option A map that was dropped two weeks prior.

You can read about the analyses here. The list of double-bunked judges in Options B and C in the district court and superior court maps can be found below. You can read all about the Option A maps here.

It should be noted, as before in other stories, “double-bunking” for the purposes of this data means that there are a smaller number of seats in a judicial district than there are current sitting judges. That means incumbent judges in those areas would either be forced to run against another incumbent in an election or face losing their seat if their term expires after the seats are filled.

Editor’s note: The two Superior Court tables have been updated to reflect an additional double-bunking in Forsyth County.

District Court Double Bunkings - Option B - Feb 2018

There are 53 African American judges out of 269 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are 17 African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareMeader HarrisWhiteMaleRepublican2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEula Reid African-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareAmber MalarneyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEdgar BarnesWhite MaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareRobert Trivette WhiteMaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeDarrell CaytonWhiteMaleUnaffiliated 2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeMichael PaulWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeRegina ParkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeChristopher McLendonWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeKeith GregoryAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
10DWakeNed MangumWhiteMaleRepublican2018
10DWakeJefferson Glenn GriffinWhiteMaleRepublican2020
10DWakeMargaret EaglesWhiteFemale Democrat2018
10DWakeDebra SasserWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeLori ChristianAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeMonica BousmanWhiteFemaleDemocrat 2020
12CNew HanoverRobin Wicks RobinsonWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverJ. H. Corpening IIWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverMelinda Haynie CrouchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
12CNew HanoverJeffery Evan NoeckerWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverRichard Russel DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandEdward PoneAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandCheri Siler-MackAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandTalmage BaggettWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandLuis OliveraHispanicMaleRepublican2020
15DCumberlandApril M. SmithAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandStephen StokesAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandRobert Steihl IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreJayrene R. ManessWhiteFemaleRepublican 2018
15DCumberlandDavid HastyWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreDon W. Creed Jr.WhiteMaleRepublican 2020
16 Hoke, MooreStephen Anthony BibeyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
16Hoke, MooreMichael A. StoneWhiteMaleRepublican2020
16 Hoke, MooreRegina M. JoeBlackFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamJames T. HillWhiteMaleRepublican2018
18ADurhamDoretta L. WalkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamFrederick S. Battaglia JrWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
18CDurhamPatricia EvansAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18CDurhamAmanda MarisWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
18CDurhamShamieka RhinehartAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordSusan R. BurchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordBetty BrownWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
22CGuilfordAngela Bullard FoxWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordTonia CutchinAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordMark Timothy CummingsAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordAngela Cheryl FosterAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordLora C. CubbageAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordJonathan KreiderWhiteMaleRepublican2018
26AMecklenburgRonald L. ChapmanWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgRegan Anthony MillerAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
26AMecklenburgChristy T. MannWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgPaige B. McTheniaWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythDavid Edward SipprellWhiteMaleRepublican2020
30AForsythLawrence J. FineWhiteMale Democrat2020
30AForsythGeorge A. BedsworthWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythTheodoros KazakosWhiteMaleRepublican2018
30AForsythLaurie HutchinsWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
30AForsythCarrie VickeryWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
30AForsythVictoria RoemerWhiteFemaleRepublican2020

Superior Court Double Bunkings - Option B - Feb 2018

There are 18 African American judges out of 95 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are seven African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
12CNew HanoverPhyllis GorhamAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2024
12CNew HanoverJay HockenburyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
15DCumberlandMary Ann TallyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandClaire HillWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2018
15DCumberlandJames Ammons Jr.WhiteMaleUnaffiliated2018
18BDurhamElaine O'NealAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18BDurhamMichael O’FoghludhaWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
19OrangeCarl FoxAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2022
19OrangeR. Allen BaddourWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellStanley AllenWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellEdwin WilsonWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellWilliam O. Smith IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordLindsay DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordSusan BrayWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2020
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandChristopher BraggWhiteMaleRepublican2018
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandJeffery CarpenterWhiteMaleRepublican2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandRichard BrownWhiteMaleDemocrat2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandTanya WallaceWhiteFemaleDemocrat2024
26EMecklenburgLisa BellWhiteFemaleRepublican2022
26EMecklenburgDonnie HooverAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
26FMecklenburgCarla ArchieAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2022
26FMecklenburgKaren Eady-WilliamsAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
30BForsythLogan Todd BurkeAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
30BForsythDavid HallWhiteMaleRepublican2020

District Court Double Bunkings - Option C - Feb 2018

There are 53 African American judges out of 269 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are 15 African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareMeader HarrisWhiteMaleRepublican2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEula Reid African-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareAmber MalarneyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEdgar BarnesWhite MaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareRobert Trivette WhiteMaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeDarrell CaytonWhiteMaleUnaffiliated 2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeMichael PaulWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeRegina ParkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeChristopher McLendonWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeKeith GregoryAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
10DWakeNed MangumWhiteMaleRepublican2018
10DWakeJefferson Glenn GriffinWhiteMaleRepublican2020
10DWakeMargaret EaglesWhiteFemale Democrat2018
10DWakeDebra SasserWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeLori ChristianAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeMonica BousmanWhiteFemaleDemocrat 2020
12CNew HanoverRobin Wicks RobinsonWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverJ. H. Corpening IIWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverMelinda Haynie CrouchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
12CNew HanoverJeffery Evan NoeckerWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverRichard Russel DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandEdward PoneAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandCheri Siler-MackAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandTalmage BaggettWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandLuis OliveraHispanicMaleRepublican2020
15DCumberlandApril M. SmithAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandStephen StokesAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandRobert Steihl IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreJayrene R. ManessWhiteFemaleRepublican 2018
15DCumberlandDavid HastyWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreDon W. Creed Jr.WhiteMaleRepublican 2020
16 Hoke, MooreStephen Anthony BibeyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
16Hoke, MooreMichael A. StoneWhiteMaleRepublican2020
16 Hoke, MooreRegina M. JoeBlackFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamJames T. HillWhiteMaleRepublican2018
18ADurhamDoretta L. WalkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamFrederick S. Battaglia JrWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordSusan R. BurchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordBetty BrownWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
22CGuilfordAngela Bullard FoxWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordTonia CutchinAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordMark Timothy CummingsAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordAngela Cheryl FosterAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordLora C. CubbageAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordJonathan KreiderWhiteMaleRepublican2018
26AMecklenburgRonald L. ChapmanWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgRegan Anthony MillerAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
26AMecklenburgChristy T. MannWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgPaige B. McTheniaWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythDavid Edward SipprellWhiteMaleRepublican2020
30AForsythLawrence J. FineWhiteMale Democrat2020
30AForsythGeorge A. BedsworthWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythTheodoros KazakosWhiteMaleRepublican2018
30AForsythLaurie HutchinsWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
30AForsythCarrie VickeryWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
30AForsythVictoria RoemerWhiteFemaleRepublican2020

Superior Court Double Bunkings - Option C - Feb 2018

There are 18 African American judges out of 95 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are seven African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
12CNew HanoverPhyllis GorhamAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2024
12CNew HanoverJay HockenburyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
15DCumberlandMary Ann TallyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandClaire HillWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2018
15DCumberlandJames Ammons Jr.WhiteMaleUnaffiliated2018
18CDurhamOrlando HudsonAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
18CDurhamMichael O’FoghludhaWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
19OrangeCarl FoxAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2022
19OrangeR. Allen BaddourWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellStanley AllenWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellEdwin WilsonWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellWilliam O. Smith IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordLindsay DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordSusan BrayWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2020
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandChristopher BraggWhiteMaleRepublican2018
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandJeffery CarpenterWhiteMaleRepublican2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandRichard BrownWhiteMaleDemocrat2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandTanya WallaceWhiteFemaleDemocrat2024
26EMecklenburgLisa BellWhiteFemaleRepublican2022
26EMecklenburgDonnie HooverAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
26FMecklenburgCarla ArchieAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2022
26FMecklenburgKaren Eady-WilliamsAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
30BForsythLogan Todd BurkeAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
30BForsythDavid HallWhite MaleRepublican2020