Biden on leaked draft opinion on abortion: The ‘right to choose is fundamental’

Abortion rights advocates respond to leaked SCOTUS decision poised to upend Roe v. Wade (w/ video)

Reaction is pouring in on social media following word of a leaked draft opinion that indicates the U.S. Supreme Court is poised to overturn the landmark Roe v. Wade case legalizing abortion nationwide.

The draft opinion signed by Justice Samuel Alito was first reported by Politico.

“Roe was egregiously wrong from the start,” the draft states.

While the draft is not the final word, reaction was swift on Twitter overnight:

Camille Adair of the Carolina Abortion Fund made the point during an NC Policy Watch Crucial Conversation event last week that the protections of  Roe have often been inaccessible to women in the South.

Adair said while the latest ruling may force women to travel further distances to seek an abortion, their work will continue.

“We are not instruments of the state, and don’t depend on them for the work. This work is literally borne in spite of the state,” said Adair.”Our work will continue as long as abortions continue, which will be forever.”

Read more of Justice Alito’s initial draft opinion here.

 

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Wake County leaders unite to celebrate new non-discrimination ordinances

Elected leaders from across Wake County came together Tuesday to celebrate their unified adoption of non-discrimination ordinances. (Photo: Equality NC)

On Tuesday the Campbell University School of Law hosted elected officials from across Wake County as they celebrated new LGBTQ-inclusive non-discrimination ordinances in Raleigh, Knightdale and Morrisville.

Leaders from those communities signed a joint ceremonial document in support of protections from discrimination in employment and public accommodation in places like restaurants and hotels.

As Policy Watch has reported, the new ordinances became possible when a state ban on new local protections — including nondiscrimination ordinances for employment and housing — was lifted. The ban was a legacy of the  brutal fight over HB 2 and HB 142, the controversial laws that excluded lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people from statewide nondiscrimination protections.

Since the ban on new ordinances expired, 18 communities across the state have adopted non-discrimination ordinances.

Campbell’s law school has taken the lead in helping resolve complaints filed through the ordinance process.

Kendra Johnson, executive director of Equality North Carolina, applauded the signing in a statement Tuesday.

“Today we celebrated the commitment of Raleigh, Knightdale and Morrisville to making their communities inclusive of all,” Johnson said. “No one should have to fear bigotry based on their ZIP code, nor should they have to move to avoid discrimination. Having non-discrimination ordinances sends a clear and powerful message that all people are welcomed and included in their home communities.”

In its statement, Equality NC stressed new and proactive state and federal protections are still needed.

“We celebrate this commitment to equality and look forward to North Carolina being a stellar example of what diversity and equity look like in legislation,” the group said in its statement. “The momentum behind these signings shows that North Carolina stands ready, and we encourage others to communicate to their local leaders now is the time to pass LGBTQ protections, demand that our state lawmakers fully repeal discriminatory laws and enact proactive protections, and urge our elected officials in the United States Congress and the NCGA to support comprehensive nondiscrimination laws.”

As Policy Watch reported last month, North Carolina has so far resisted a national wave of anti-LGBTQ legislation. But LGBTQ advocates and Democratic state lawmakers warn of gathering momentum for such laws on the political right. With elections looming, the political calculus at both the state and federal level could soon change.

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