Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

Which judges are double-bunked in the new maps? Here’s a list

Lawmakers have said they won’t be back until May to take up judicial redistricting, but dropped two new maps before adjourning a special session this week.

The maps this time were released with incumbency information, but not without errors. NC Policy Watch analyzed the information (again) and found that there are more judges double-bunked in the new proposals (Options B and C) than in the Option A map that was dropped two weeks prior.

You can read about the analyses here. The list of double-bunked judges in Options B and C in the district court and superior court maps can be found below. You can read all about the Option A maps here.

It should be noted, as before in other stories, “double-bunking” for the purposes of this data means that there are a smaller number of seats in a judicial district than there are current sitting judges. That means incumbent judges in those areas would either be forced to run against another incumbent in an election or face losing their seat if their term expires after the seats are filled.

District Court Double Bunkings - Option B - Feb 2018

There are 53 African American judges out of 269 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are 17 African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareMeader HarrisWhiteMaleRepublican2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEula Reid African-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareAmber MalarneyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEdgar BarnesWhite MaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareRobert Trivette WhiteMaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeDarrell CaytonWhiteMaleUnaffiliated 2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeMichael PaulWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeRegina ParkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeChristopher McLendonWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeKeith GregoryAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
10DWakeNed MangumWhiteMaleRepublican2018
10DWakeJefferson Glenn GriffinWhiteMaleRepublican2020
10DWakeMargaret EaglesWhiteFemale Democrat2018
10DWakeDebra SasserWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeLori ChristianAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeMonica BousmanWhiteFemaleDemocrat 2020
12CNew HanoverRobin Wicks RobinsonWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverJ. H. Corpening IIWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverMelinda Haynie CrouchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
12CNew HanoverJeffery Evan NoeckerWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverRichard Russel DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandEdward PoneAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandCheri Siler-MackAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandTalmage BaggettWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandLuis OliveraHispanicMaleRepublican2020
15DCumberlandApril M. SmithAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandStephen StokesAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandRobert Steihl IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreJayrene R. ManessWhiteFemaleRepublican 2018
15DCumberlandDavid HastyWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreDon W. Creed Jr.WhiteMaleRepublican 2020
16 Hoke, MooreStephen Anthony BibeyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
16Hoke, MooreMichael A. StoneWhiteMaleRepublican2020
16 Hoke, MooreRegina M. JoeBlackFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamJames T. HillWhiteMaleRepublican2018
18ADurhamDoretta L. WalkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamFrederick S. Battaglia JrWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
18CDurhamPatricia EvansAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18CDurhamAmanda MarisWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
18CDurhamShamieka RhinehartAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordSusan R. BurchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordBetty BrownWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
22CGuilfordAngela Bullard FoxWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordTonia CutchinAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordMark Timothy CummingsAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordAngela Cheryl FosterAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordLora C. CubbageAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordJonathan KreiderWhiteMaleRepublican2018
26AMecklenburgRonald L. ChapmanWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgRegan Anthony MillerAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
26AMecklenburgChristy T. MannWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgPaige B. McTheniaWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythDavid Edward SipprellWhiteMaleRepublican2020
30AForsythLawrence J. FineWhiteMale Democrat2020
30AForsythGeorge A. BedsworthWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythTheodoros KazakosWhiteMaleRepublican2018
30AForsythLaurie HutchinsWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
30AForsythCarrie VickeryWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
30AForsythVictoria RoemerWhiteFemaleRepublican2020

Superior Court Double Bunkings - Option B - Feb 2018

There are 18 African American judges out of 95 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are six African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
12CNew HanoverPhyllis GorhamAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2024
12CNew HanoverJay HockenburyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
15DCumberlandMary Ann TallyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandClaire HillWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2018
15DCumberlandJames Ammons Jr.WhiteMaleUnaffiliated2018
18BDurhamElaine O'NealAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18BDurhamMichael O’FoghludhaWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
19OrangeCarl FoxAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2022
19OrangeR. Allen BaddourWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellStanley AllenWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellEdwin WilsonWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellWilliam O. Smith IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordLindsay DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordSusan BrayWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2020
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandChristopher BraggWhiteMaleRepublican2018
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandJeffery CarpenterWhiteMaleRepublican2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandRichard BrownWhiteMaleDemocrat2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandTanya WallaceWhiteFemaleDemocrat2024
26EMecklenburgLisa BellWhiteFemaleRepublican2022
26EMecklenburgDonnie HooverAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
26FMecklenburgCarla ArchieAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2022
26FMecklenburgKaren Eady-WilliamsAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020

District Court Double Bunkings - Option C - Feb 2018

There are 53 African American judges out of 269 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are 15 African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareMeader HarrisWhiteMaleRepublican2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEula Reid African-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareAmber MalarneyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareEdgar BarnesWhite MaleDemocrat2020
1Gates, Chowan, Perquimans, Pasquotank, Camden, Currituck, DareRobert Trivette WhiteMaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeDarrell CaytonWhiteMaleUnaffiliated 2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeMichael PaulWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeRegina ParkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
2Martin, Beaufort, Washington, Tyrrell, HydeChristopher McLendonWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeKeith GregoryAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
10DWakeNed MangumWhiteMaleRepublican2018
10DWakeJefferson Glenn GriffinWhiteMaleRepublican2020
10DWakeMargaret EaglesWhiteFemale Democrat2018
10DWakeDebra SasserWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeLori ChristianAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
10DWakeMonica BousmanWhiteFemaleDemocrat 2020
12CNew HanoverRobin Wicks RobinsonWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverJ. H. Corpening IIWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverMelinda Haynie CrouchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
12CNew HanoverJeffery Evan NoeckerWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
12CNew HanoverRichard Russel DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandEdward PoneAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
15BCumberlandCheri Siler-MackAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandTalmage BaggettWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
15BCumberlandLuis OliveraHispanicMaleRepublican2020
15DCumberlandApril M. SmithAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandStephen StokesAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandRobert Steihl IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreJayrene R. ManessWhiteFemaleRepublican 2018
15DCumberlandDavid HastyWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
16 Hoke, MooreDon W. Creed Jr.WhiteMaleRepublican 2020
16 Hoke, MooreStephen Anthony BibeyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
16Hoke, MooreMichael A. StoneWhiteMaleRepublican2020
16 Hoke, MooreRegina M. JoeBlackFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamJames T. HillWhiteMaleRepublican2018
18ADurhamDoretta L. WalkerAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2018
18ADurhamFrederick S. Battaglia JrWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordSusan R. BurchWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordBetty BrownWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
22CGuilfordAngela Bullard FoxWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
22CGuilfordTonia CutchinAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordMark Timothy CummingsAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordAngela Cheryl FosterAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordLora C. CubbageAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
22DGuilfordJonathan KreiderWhiteMaleRepublican2018
26AMecklenburgRonald L. ChapmanWhiteMaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgRegan Anthony MillerAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2018
26AMecklenburgChristy T. MannWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
26AMecklenburgPaige B. McTheniaWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythDavid Edward SipprellWhiteMaleRepublican2020
30AForsythLawrence J. FineWhiteMale Democrat2020
30AForsythGeorge A. BedsworthWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
30AForsythTheodoros KazakosWhiteMaleRepublican2018
30AForsythLaurie HutchinsWhiteFemaleRepublican2020
30AForsythCarrie VickeryWhiteFemaleDemocrat2020
30AForsythVictoria RoemerWhiteFemaleRepublican2020

Superior Court Double Bunkings - Option C - Feb 2018

There are 18 African American judges out of 95 total judges, according to Jan. 25 AOC info. There are six African American judges double-bunked in these proposed maps.
This information is based on the North Carolina voter registration database.
DistrictCounty(s)NameRaceGenderPartyTerm Expiration
12CNew HanoverPhyllis GorhamAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2024
12CNew HanoverJay HockenburyWhiteMaleRepublican2018
15DCumberlandMary Ann TallyWhiteFemaleDemocrat2018
15DCumberlandClaire HillWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2018
15DCumberlandJames Ammons Jr.WhiteMaleUnaffiliated2018
18CDurhamOrlando HudsonAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
18CDurhamMichael O’FoghludhaWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
19OrangeCarl FoxAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2022
19OrangeR. Allen BaddourWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellStanley AllenWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellEdwin WilsonWhiteMaleDemocrat2022
21Rockingham, CaswellWilliam O. Smith IIIWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordLindsay DavisWhiteMaleDemocrat2018
22CGuilfordSusan BrayWhiteFemaleUnaffiliated2020
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandChristopher BraggWhiteMaleRepublican2018
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandJeffery CarpenterWhiteMaleRepublican2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandRichard BrownWhiteMaleDemocrat2024
24Union, Anson, Richmond, ScotlandTanya WallaceWhiteFemaleDemocrat2024
26EMecklenburgLisa BellWhiteFemaleRepublican2022
26EMecklenburgDonnie HooverAfrican-AmericanMaleDemocrat2020
26FMecklenburgCarla ArchieAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2022
26FMecklenburgKaren Eady-WilliamsAfrican-AmericanFemaleDemocrat2020
Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

Republicans denounce partisan judicial elections in merit selection discussion

Buddy Wester

The Federalist Society’s Triangle Lawyers Chapter hosted a discussion Thursday on merit selection, but panelists instead focused on the pros and cons of partisan judicial elections.

Buddy Wester, a business attorney from Charlotte, and Bob Orr, a former state Supreme Court justice — both of whom are registered Republicans — denounced partisan labels for judges, which were recently reinstated by GOP lawmakers.

“Of the vast majority of the voters considering judicial candidates, affiliation is the only sure thing the voter can know on that candidate and expresses, indeed, it assures, this unequivocal: this candidate will be allegiant to the platform and ideology of his or her party when he or she hears evidence and makes rulings in cases,” Wester said. “Never mind what the cases concern and that 90 percent plus of them have no political cast whatsoever to them.”

He added that the purpose of partisan labels is to lock all the judicial candidates “arm-in-arm” with candidates for other offices.

Orr said he considered himself an expert in statewide partisan judicial elections after running in five of them.

“In reality, in a state that now has 10 million residents with, I think, around 5.5 million registered voters, a partisan judicial race is a $1,400 lottery ticket for an eight-year term on one of our state’s two highest courts,” he said. “As you know, all you need is a law license and the filing fee and you can run for judicial office for the Court of Appeals or the state Supreme Court.”

He described challenges, including the tension partisan races creates within a court when colleagues of the opposite parties are running for office and ask each other for support.

Voters, he said, and often many lawyers, are clueless or poorly informed about how good a job any particular justice or judge is doing anyone running against them in a race.

“I don’t think partisan elections are any more transparent, and in some respects, work against it than reform systems,” he said.

The third panelist, Chris Bonneau, Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh, tried to make a case for partisan elections, noting they weren’t “as bad as people say.”

“There’s no perfect way to select judges,” he said.

He said that partisan labels give voters more information about the candidates they vote for and increases transparency.

He added that North Carolina’s reputation for passing bills regarding judicial selection may be harming the public perception of the courts.

“Every year in states across the country, bills are introduced to change how judges are selected,” Bonneau said. “North Carolina is unique in that you guys actually pass them, and you pass them all the time. … If you’re concerned about the legitimacy of the courts, pick something and stick to it for awhile, and don’t keep changing it every time there’s a new political party in power, because that will do more to revoke the legitimacy of the courts than anything else you do.”

State Supreme Court Chief Justice Mark Martin moderated the panel discussion. He endorsed merit selection last year before it was made known lawmakers were considering such a plan.

“My hope, as a part of this discussion today, is to help increase public interest in and understanding of the different methods of judicial selection,” he said. “I have personally been appointed to judicial office twice and I have run for judicial office four times — two partisan races and two non partisan races.”

Wester said toward the end of the meeting that he believed North Carolina could become the beacon for the best judicial selection model in the country if done right.

Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

State court refuses new districts in Wake, Mecklenburg; recommends new lawsuit

A state court has refused to order new districts in Wake and Mecklenburg counties after the U.S. Supreme Court stayed a special master’s plan for those areas, likely because of jurisdictional issues with state constitutional violations vs federal ones.

After the Supreme Court’s ruling last week in North Carolina v. Covington, a three-judge panel in Wake County Superior Court was asked to review a similar racial gerrymandering case challenging the same maps.

The panel concluded that “significant practical difficulties, if not jurisdictional impediments, exist when one court is called upon to construe and enforce another court’s order that was made upon a distinct and separate record by distinct and separate plaintiffs.”

The panel thought the new state constitutional claims in Covington’s remedial maps best be asserted in new litigation.

“We are reviewing what the next steps are for the plaintiffs in the case who have been seeking justice since 2011 and still have not found it,” said Allison Riggs, senior voting rights attorney for the Southern Coalition for Social Justice and attorney for the plaintiffs in the case. “We are concerned by the precedent set in today’s order. When a plan is found to be unconstitutional, it’s only right for the court to review the remedy enacted to make sure that it is legal and fair.”

Dickson v. Rucho_Filed Order on Remand by NC Policy Watch on Scribd

Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

New hybrid bill includes revision of Ethics, Elections merge

The North Carolina Supreme Court recently struck down a General Assembly law merging the State Board of Elections and State Ethics Commission, and lawmakers are trying to pass a fix before heading back to the lower court.

House Bill 90 addresses education issues, Atlanta Coast Pipeline funds and the Cooper v. Berger decision from the Supreme Court.

The measure adds one seat to the State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement for someone who is not affiliated with either of the political parties with the most registered affiliates.

That means the Board would consist of four Republican members, four Democratic members and one unaffiliated member. Cooper can appoint all nine members of the new board — eight from a list of names compiled by the majority parties and one from a list of two names compiled by the other eight appointed members.

“The purpose of this legislation is to implement the decision of the North Carolina Supreme Court … to give the Governor executive control over the Bipartisan State Board of Elections and Ethics Enforcement and to provide for representation on the State Board by unaffiliated and third-party voters,” the bill states.

Cooper’s office has not yet responded to a request for comment.

Courts & the Law, Defending Democracy, News

North Carolina redistricting litigation: What the heck is going on?

Less than 24 hours after the U.S. Supreme Court blocked some of a special master’s districts from being implemented, plaintiffs in a similar racial gerrymandering case have asked a state court to get involved.

And a little more than an hour after the new challenge was announced, Rep. David Lewis (R-Harnett) called a press conference to complain about all the redistricting litigation.

“Here we go again,” he said. “These liberal dark money groups financed and controlled by allies of the Democratic party are determined to use and abuse the court system to achieve unprecedented chaos. In short, it appears that they will sue until North Carolina is blue despite what the people, despite what the voters want.”

It does seem like there’s been a lot of redistricting litigation going on, but it hasn’t just been Democrats taking advantage of their legal options — the GOP has also filed their fair share of documents, including a number of emergency pleas to higher courts when they don’t get the ruling they want.

There’s a saying about glass houses, but instead of getting into that, check out this breakdown of the most recent redistricting case:

  • When the U.S. Supreme Court upheld that 28 House and Senate districts were racially gerrymandered, lawmakers redrew the districts.
  • The plaintiffs — voters harmed by the unconstitutional gerrymandering — challenged 12 of those redrawn districts alleging state and federal constitutional violations.
  • A federal three-judge panel appointed a special master to evaluate and potentially redraw those districts. Stanford Law Professor Nathaniel Persily agreed they were unconstitutional and redrew the districts.
  • After briefings and a hearing on Persily’s maps, the panel ordered they be enacted over lawmakers’ redrawn plans for this year’s elections.
  • Lawmakers immediately filed an emergency request for the U.S. Supreme Court to block the ruling and announced they planned to appeal. One of the points they made was that the federal court should not have ruled on state constitutional issues (a ban on mid-decade redistricting), as was the case with House districts in Wake and Mecklenburg counties. “Any state-law challenge to HD36, HD37, HD40, HD41, and HD105 thus must be filed in state court, where state judges familiar with the state constitution can address the unsettled question of how N.C. Const. art. II, §5(4) applies when a federal court invalidates a duly enacted map.”
  • The U.S. Supreme Court issues a split order: some of the special master’s maps can be used in this year’s elections and some can’t, at least temporarily pending an appeal. The districts that can’t be used are the ones that involve questions of state law.
  • The plaintiffs in a racial gerrymandering case that challenged legislative maps at the state level filed a court document asking state judges to order new districts into effect in Wake and Mecklenburg counties, where they accused lawmakers of violating the mid-decade redistricting ban.
  • Lewis calls a press conference to criticize plaintiffs for filing more litigation.