Biden immigration overhaul would open a door to citizenship for 11 million people

Biden in final debate vows an immigration overhaul in his first 100 days as president

Former Vice President Joe Biden speaks at a rally earlier this year – Image: Sean Rayford, Getty Images

WASHINGTON—Democratic presidential candidate Joe Biden on Thursday night distanced himself from the Obama administration’s handling of undocumented people that led to the highest rate of deportations of any presidency and said he would act swiftly on immigration as president.

During the final presidential debate at Belmont University in Nashville, Biden admitted that the Obama administration made a mistake in not reforming immigration policy during eight years in office. More than 3 million undocumented people were deported while Barack Obama was president and Biden served as his vice president.

“It took too long to get it right,” Biden said.

Biden said if he’s elected, within 100 days he’s going to direct Congress to craft a legislative pathway to citizenship for more than 11 million undocumented people living in the U.S.

Biden has released two immigration policies, in which the first portion would undo all the Trump administration policies, such as family separations, and end detention centers for children. The second part would work to provide a path for citizenship.

“And all of those so-called dreamers, those DACA kids, they’re going to be immediately certified again to be able to stay in this country and put on a path to citizenship,” Biden said, referring to an Obama-era program for undocumented people brought to the United States as children.

President Donald Trump defended his administration’s immigration policies and blamed the Obama administration for creating detention facilities in the first place.

“Who made the cages, Joe?” Trump asked multiple times.

The Trump administration has come under fire this week after lawyers told a federal judge that they cannot find the parents of 545 children who were separated under the administration’s “zero tolerance” policy. The Trump administration started separating families in 2017 under a pilot program.

“Their kids were ripped from their arms and separated,” Biden said. “And now they cannot find over 500 sets of those parents and those kids are alone. It’s criminal.”

Trump, returning to a familiar theme that appeals to his political base, said that the Obama administration’s practice of “catch and release” let dangerous people into the country.

The term comes from the George W. Bush administration and it allows an undocumented person to live in the US while they await a hearing in immigration court rather than stay in a detention center.

“He has no understanding of immigration law,” Trump said of his opponent. “‘Capture and release’ was a disaster, a murderer would come in, and a rapist would come in, a very bad person would come in and we would take their name and have to release them into our country.”

Trump also said that those who are apprehended “don’t come back” for their court cases, “except for those with the lowest IQ, they might come back.” Biden responded that it is “simply not true” they don’t come back. FactCheck.org has said that the Trump administration itself has said that 50 percent of those apprehended and released appear in court.

Immigrant families in NC are pleading with Tillis and Burr for assistance

Sen. Thom Tillis, left, and Sen. Richard Burr, right

It’s been over 200 days since the first COVID-19 relief package was signed into law. In a short time, immigrant communities across the country will once again find out where they stand in our leaders’ hearts and minds. Congress has passed not one, but three COVID-19 relief packages that have excluded thousands of immigrants here in North Carolina and millions more nationwide. A legislative response that protects all people requires leadership by Senator Thom Tillis and Senator Richard Burr.

In North Carolina, 889,000 people live in families with at least one non-citizen, including 321,000 children. El Pueblo and other immigrant-serving organizations throughout the state recognize the gap in COVID relief for immigrant communities and have opened mutual aid funds and other services to address this gap. Our top priority has been to distribute direct financial assistance to those who are not receiving any government aid. The amount of need is both astounding and frightening as we have moved many months into this crisis. We know that we are not able to help everyone who has been excluded by congressional leaders.

Community members continue to request assistance to pay for rent, bills, utilities, food, and other basic needs due to loss of work and, increasingly, due to the economic impacts of having one or more loved ones who have been ill and/or hospitalized due to COVID. While we have been able to financially assist many families, our mutual aid funds are not the solution for the lack of action by congressional leaders. Our organizations are helping fill a gap that should not exist. We cannot afford to have gaps in relief to communities; not now, not ever.

The ultimate solution for our communities includes transformational change that would provide full inclusion for immigrants and other community members who have been disproportionately affected by the pandemic due to systemic racism, xenophobia, and other barriers to health. A first step toward this solution would be for Senators Tillis and Burr to support the HEROES Act, an inclusive relief bill that was passed by the House in May.

My parents are immigrants that have shown me the importance of being in community with one another and of supporting each other when government support may or may not be available. In these times of hardship, I see my communities coming together every day to do our best to do what our leaders have failed to do. For months, the Senate has refused to advance this legislation while our communities have suffered. The HEROES Act, while not the ultimate solution for all of the challenges we face, includes critical provisions that would improve health care access and provide economic support for thousands of immigrant families in North Carolina. I urge Senators Tillis and Burr to support the HEROES Act and demonstrate what so many other North Carolinians like my parents are demonstrating every day: that the health and prosperity of each of us depends on the health and prosperity of all of us.

Veronica Aguilar is the Communications Coordinator for the Raleigh-based group, El Pueblo.

Border officials did not follow guidelines on migrant children’s health care, government investigators find

U.S. Customs and Border Protection has not consistently followed new guidelines for medical care of migrant children and spent some of the agency’s money designated for “medical care” on unrelated items like printers, speakers and its canine program, according to a new federal investigation.

The U.S. Government Accountability Office, an independent “congressional watchdog,” found gaps in care across border facilities. Border officials also chose to go against a recommendation from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to give the flu vaccine to children who crossed the border into the United States.

The GAO released the findings Wednesday, as members of the U.S. House Homeland Security Committee held a hearing as part of an ongoing investigation of Customs and Border Protection (CBP) policies in light of the deaths of two children at the border in December 2018.

The children, 8-year-old Felipe Alonzo-Gomez and 7-year-old Jakelin Caal, were both Guatemalan and died in different CBP holding facilities in New Mexico and Texas.

“The simple reality is that children shouldn’t be locked up by our government,” U.S. Rep. Val Demings of Florida said in an email. “This administration’s anti-immigrant hysteria has led to deeply inhumane treatment of asylum seekers and others who are seeking legal status here in the United States.”

Demings, who is under consideration to be the vice presidential candidate for presumptive Democratic nominee Joe Biden, is a member of the committee but did not question witnesses at the hearing.

U.S. Rep. Debbie Lesko, an Arizona Republican who sits on the committee, called the children’s deaths tragic but said the federal government isn’t necessarily at fault. “We should start blaming the cartels, don’t you think, and they should be at least partially accountable for children’s death,” she said at the hearing.

Pennsylvania Sen. Bob Casey, a Democrat, asked the GAO to look into the matter in the wake of reports showing what he called an “appalling disregard for the lives of migrant children” at the border. He tweeted Wednesday that the funding for the U.S. Homeland Security Department — which oversees CBP — must carry “clear directives and restrictions to ensure transparency and accountability.”

The Inspector General of the Homeland Security Department released its own findings Wednesday that both children died of natural causes related to the flu and bacterial infections. The Inspector General found there was no misconduct or malfeasance from border patrol agents.

But Dr. Fiona Danaher, a pediatrician who Democrats asked to review the records, said the agency needs more policies in place to protect children.

“Death by natural causes does not mean death was inevitable,” said Danaher, an instructor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School.

Democratic lawmakers grilled witnesses from the GAO and Inspector General’s office on whether CBP equips its agents to identify when a child might need further medical help.

“CBP did not provide officers and agents with training to identify medical distress in children, is that correct?” Rep. Cedric Richmond, a Democrat from New Orleans and a member of the committee, asked.

The Homeland Security Department’s Inspector General, Joseph Cuffari, said agents are trained in basic first aid, CPR and trauma care. They had no pediatric training.

Tennessee Republican Rep. Mark Green, a physician, said putting more medical staff at the border may be an unreasonable ask in a country already facing a shortage of doctors in rural areas.

“Where in the world are we going to get the doctors to put somebody at every single crossing?” Green asked.

Richmond opened his remarks with criticism of that perspective.

“It is a proverbial Trumpism, pitting communities against each other. I guess that is where we are going in terms of access to doctors. I just won’t entertain it,” Richmond said. “We are the greatest country in the world.”

Gaps in care

The deaths happened in the midst of a surge at the border that backed up the immigration system last year. Read more

Students in U.S. on visas will not be able to stay if campuses go online-only

Students in the U.S. on student visas will not be able to enter or remain in the country if their courses are online only, U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) announced Monday.

None of the UNC System’s 17 campuses plans to begin the Fall semester online-only. UNC-Chapel Hill is reserving spaces in its Carolina Away online program for foreign students who can’t procure visas.  But the change in policy could mean that such students already in the U.S. whose semester begins on campus would have to leave the country if, as happened last semester, the universities close to in-person teaching because of  the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.

With North Carolina still experiencing record COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations, many of the system’s students, faculty and administration consider a return to online-only education before the end of the semester a strong possibility.